Brotherhood of the Pre-Raphaelites (part 6)
The fate of this talented - and still underrated artist - has been difficult. He was a little older than the Pre-Raphaelites, but by the time he became friends with…

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Mexican painting of the first half of the XX century (part 2)
The start of the Mexican schedule itself was laid by the largest engraver of the XIX century - Jose Guadalupe Posada. He worked as an artist in newspapers, first in…

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Barbizon School of Painting (part 5)
The views of the Barbizonians are many contradictory. Striving for a truthful depiction of nature, they, paradoxically, were negative towards realism, considering it too prosaic, aimed at creating "copies", and…

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Ordinary magic glass (part 2)

The art of the Venetian masters aroused delight and imitation. Legends were made about him. Their works were so amazing that they were considered magical: they seemed to save from poison and disease, it was only necessary to drain the precious goblet of Venetian work. And subtle connoisseurs sometimes bequeathed to put the most valuable objects of colored glass in their tombs, from where archaeologists extracted them. So some of the early Venetian colored glass products painted with colored enamels and gold managed to reach us. Continue reading

How did the masters of the Italian Renaissance study (part 2)

Here is a quote from a book by Giovio, an Italian historian of the 16th century. He describes the teaching method of Leonardo da Vinci, which gives us an idea of ​​the nature of instruction in workshops of the 15th – 16th centuries. According to Giovio, Leonardo strictly forbade students to use brushes and paints for the time being, “allowing them only to choose and painstakingly paint with their lead pencil the immortal samples of the most ancient works, to transmit with the simplest strokes the forces of nature and the contours of bodies that appear before our eyes in such a variety of movements. Continue reading

Brotherhood of the Pre-Raphaelites (part 6)

The fate of this talented – and still underrated artist – has been difficult. He was a little older than the Pre-Raphaelites, but by the time he became friends with them, he already had fifteen years of professional experience and studied in Belgium, France and Italy.

Brown tended to create great dramatic compositions. “It was in Paris that I decided to paint realistic paintings, because not a single Frenchman painted like that,” he said later. Continue reading

Brotherhood of the Pre-Raphaelites (part 4)
A storm broke out in 1850, partly due to Rossetti's tactlessness. All members of the fraternity had to sacredly keep the secrets of the initials of “PRB” sacred, and so…

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How did the masters of the Italian Renaissance study (part 1)
Verrocchio, Mantegna, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo. The greatest geniuses. What a vivid personality and how much they differ from each other! What unites the unsurpassed masters of that time, which…

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18th century Venetian landscape painters (part 2)
Giovanni Antonio Canaletto (1697–1768), who managed to combine documentary precision with a subtle sense of nature, became the true master of the Vedut. He began to work as a painter…

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Brotherhood of the Pre-Raphaelites (part 3)
The first works with the mysterious monogram "PRB" appeared at exhibitions only in 1849. These were Lorenzo and Isabella by Milles, The Virginity of Mary by Rossetti, and Rienzi Hunt.…

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