Venice School of Painting (part 3)
Carpaccio is related by poetic mood to the greatest of the Venetian painters of the 15th century - Giovanni Bellini, the youngest son of Jacopo. But his artistic interests lay…

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How did the masters of the Italian Renaissance study (part 2)
Here is a quote from a book by Giovio, an Italian historian of the 16th century. He describes the teaching method of Leonardo da Vinci, which gives us an idea…

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Olympia - the sanctuary of Hellas (part 3)
The sculptor shows the moment before the start of the competition. Heroes are presented before the main events unfold. In each image, the outcome of this drama is read. Researchers…

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Monthly Archives: February 2018

Antique Cologne (part 4)

In Cologne, stone tombs of Roman legionnaires were also found. There were quarries designed specifically for their manufacture. The setting of tombstones was a sign of the welfare of the deceased. On one of the best reliefs of this type, the tombstones of veteran Julius Materna and his wife, a scene of the “grave meal”, traditional for antiquity, is presented. Julius Matern himself is lying on the bed at the banquet table, next to him is his wife, his beloved dog, there are minions on each side. Continue reading

How did the masters of the Italian Renaissance study (part 3)

As another example, let us trace how the creative personality of Michelangelo was formed. For thirteen years he entered the studio of the painter Domenico Ghirlandaio. At age 15, he made a satire mask, which attracted the attention of the enlightened Florentine ruler Lorenzo Medici, a great philanthropist and a versatile person.

Young Michelangelo moved to an art school at the court of Lorenzo, where he began to study under the guidance of Bertoldo di Giovanni, a student of Donatello. Continue reading

How did the masters of the Italian Renaissance study (part 2)

Here is a quote from a book by Giovio, an Italian historian of the 16th century. He describes the teaching method of Leonardo da Vinci, which gives us an idea of ​​the nature of instruction in workshops of the 15th – 16th centuries. According to Giovio, Leonardo strictly forbade students to use brushes and paints for the time being, “allowing them only to choose and painstakingly paint with their lead pencil the immortal samples of the most ancient works, to transmit with the simplest strokes the forces of nature and the contours of bodies that appear before our eyes in such a variety of movements. Continue reading

How did the masters of the Italian Renaissance study (part 2)
Here is a quote from a book by Giovio, an Italian historian of the 16th century. He describes the teaching method of Leonardo da Vinci, which gives us an idea…

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Mexican painting of the first half of the XX century (part 1)
In the XX century, one of the most significant phenomena of world culture unexpectedly became the art of Latin America, especially Mexico. The dramatic history of this country is replete…

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Ordinary magic glass (part 1)
The expression "Venetian glass" has become a household word. It is used for a high appreciation of the artistic merits of works of glass. And it is no coincidence that…

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Olympia - the sanctuary of Hellas (part 4)
In the building of the workshop there were altars. The disciples of Phidias received the nickname of the cleaners, as they were entrusted with the honorable duty of cleaning the…

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