Brotherhood of the Pre-Raphaelites (part 2)
The very name of the fraternity seemed to imply recognition of the art of Raphael's predecessors and a denial of himself. But this is not so. The picturesque achievements of…

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Coroplasts from Tanagra (part 2)
In St. Petersburg, they became interested in the offer. Different motives led the parties to the transaction. The Minister of the Court, Count I.I. Vorontsov-Dashkov, was preoccupied with external prestige…

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Antique Cologne (part 3)
But the height of perfection is the glass produced in Cologne. It is impossible to pass by glass vessels with handles in the form of the Greek letter "omega", depicting…

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Egyptian ostracons (part 4)

Ostracons constitute a significant, but little-known layer of Egyptian art. They can be divided into several categories: drawings, sketches, compositions for wall paintings and reliefs, fluent full-scale sketches, in which the masters made sketches of vivid postures, facial expressions, gestures, drawings, models, which served as a kind of visual aids.

Leading masters were fluent in the technique of carving and painting, and each of them was an excellent draftsman. In the sketch-models of compositions and details of individual scenes, they saw only the preliminary stage of work, without giving them independent artistic significance. They often simply threw ostracons after their role in the preparatory phase was exhausted.

In sketches on ostracons, artists allowed themselves to depict scenes of comic, grotesque content that were not intended for wide viewing. The bold ease of these works, the diversity of their themes, their appeal to everyday life reveal another important aspect of ancient Egyptian art – unofficial and non-canonical, warmed by sincerity feelings. They allow us not only to look into the creative laboratory of the master, but also to feel the beating of his heart, which responded to all the truly beautiful that life gave.

Venice School of Painting (part 5)
The last great master of Venice of the 16th century, Jacopo Tintoretto, seems to be a complex and rebellious nature, a seeker of new paths in art, keenly and painfully…

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Venice School of Painting (part 2)
Venetians more than the masters of other Italian schools appreciated the capabilities of this technique and completely transformed it. For example, the attitude of Dutch artists to the world was…

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Barbizon School of Painting (part 6)
The Russian critic V.V. Stasov appreciated the Barbizonians because “they did not decorate or sweeten, but conveyed the true forms of nature, the nature of Russian, French, and at the…

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18th century Venetian landscape painters (part 1)
By the beginning of the XVIII century, the once powerful Venice had lost the significance of the political center of the Mediterranean, turning into a kind of pilgrimage center. Rich…

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