Brotherhood of the Pre-Raphaelites (part 6)
The fate of this talented - and still underrated artist - has been difficult. He was a little older than the Pre-Raphaelites, but by the time he became friends with…

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Mexican painting of the first half of the XX century (part 3)
The workshop absorbed the wonderful traditions of Mexican art, became a phenomenon of world graphics of the XX century. The masters of this association developed the progressive traditions of other…

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Coroplasts from Tanagra (part 2)
In St. Petersburg, they became interested in the offer. Different motives led the parties to the transaction. The Minister of the Court, Count I.I. Vorontsov-Dashkov, was preoccupied with external prestige…

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Venice School of Painting (part 5)

The last great master of Venice of the 16th century, Jacopo Tintoretto, seems to be a complex and rebellious nature, a seeker of new paths in art, keenly and painfully experiencing the dramatic conflicts of modern reality.

Tintoretto introduces into her interpretation a personal, and often a subjectively arbitrary principle, subordinating human figures to certain unknown forces that scatter and circle them. By speeding up the prospective reduction, it creates the illusion of a rapid run of space, choosing unusual points of view and fancifully changing the outlines of figures. Simple, everyday scenes are transformed by the invasion of surreal fantasy light. At the same time, the world retains its grandeur, is full of echoes of great human dramas, clashes of passions and characters.

The greatest creative feat of Tintoretto was the creation of an extensive, consisting of more than twenty large wall panels and many ceiling compositions, of a painting cycle in Scuola di San Rocco, on which the artist worked for almost a quarter century – from 1564 to 1587. By the inexhaustible wealth of artistic imagination, by the breadth of the world embracing a universal tragedy of scale (“Golgotha”), and a miracle that transforms a poor shepherd’s hut (“Christmas of Christ”), and the mysterious grandeur of nature (“Mary Magdalene in the desert” ), and the high exploits of the human spirit (“Christ before Pilate”), this cycle has no equal in the art of Italy. Similar to the majestic and tragic symphony, he completes, along with other works by Tintoretto, the history of the Venetian Renaissance school of painting.

Mexican painting of the first half of the XX century (part 2)
The start of the Mexican schedule itself was laid by the largest engraver of the XIX century - Jose Guadalupe Posada. He worked as an artist in newspapers, first in…

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Brotherhood of the Pre-Raphaelites (part 1)
For a correct understanding of the movement of the Pre-Raphaelites, it is necessary to identify the difference between its individual stages, stretching over several decades. It should be noted that…

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Turkmen folk costume (part 2)
Apparently, the patterns covering the collar, sleeves and hem of the dressing gowns and shirts are also associated with these ideas. For certain areas and tribal groups, special ornaments and…

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Barbizon School of Painting (part 5)
The views of the Barbizonians are many contradictory. Striving for a truthful depiction of nature, they, paradoxically, were negative towards realism, considering it too prosaic, aimed at creating "copies", and…

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