Indian art products
The creation of artistically designed household items is one of the oldest forms of art in India. Its effect is powerful, because it brings a huge aesthetic joy to a…

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Olympia - the sanctuary of Hellas (part 3)
The sculptor shows the moment before the start of the competition. Heroes are presented before the main events unfold. In each image, the outcome of this drama is read. Researchers…

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Mexican painting of the first half of the XX century (part 2)
The start of the Mexican schedule itself was laid by the largest engraver of the XIX century - Jose Guadalupe Posada. He worked as an artist in newspapers, first in…

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Venice School of Painting (part 1)

The legacy of the Venetian school of painting is one of the brightest pages in the history of the Italian Renaissance. The “Pearl of the Adriatic,” a bizarrely picturesque city with canals and marble palaces, spread over 119 islands among the waters of the Gulf of Venice, was the capital of a powerful trading republic, which held in its hands all trade between Europe and the countries of the East. This became the basis of the prosperity and political influence of Venice, which included part of Northern Italy, the Adriatic coast of the Balkan Peninsula, and overseas territories. She was one of the leading centers of Italian culture, typography, and humanistic education.

She also gave the world such wonderful masters as Giovanni Bellini and Carpaccio, Giorgione and Titian, Veronese and Tintoretto. Their work enriched European art with such significant artistic discoveries that later-age artists from Rubens and Velazquez to Surikov constantly turned to Venetian painting of the Renaissance.

The Venetians extremely experienced the feeling of the joy of being, discovered the world around them in all their full-blooded life, inexhaustible colorful wealth. They were characterized by a special taste for everything specifically unique, the emotional richness of perception, admiration for the physical, material diversity of the world.

Artists were attracted by the fancifully picturesque view of Venice, the festivity and colorfulness of its life, the characteristic appearance of the townspeople. Even religious paintings were often interpreted as historical compositions or monumental genre scenes. Painting in Venice more often than in other Italian schools had a secular character. The vast halls of the magnificent residence of the Venetian rulers – the Doge’s Palace were decorated with portraits and great historical compositions. Monumental narrative cycles were also written for the Venetian Scuols – religious-philanthropic brotherhoods uniting the laity. Finally, private collecting was especially widespread in Venice, and collection owners — wealthy and educated patricians — often ordered paintings for plots drawn from antiquity or the works of Italian poets. It is not surprising that the highest flowering of such purely secular genres as portrait, historical and mythological picture, landscape, and rural scene is associated with Venice.

The most important discovery of the Venetians was the coloristic and pictorial principles they developed. Among other Italian artists there were many excellent colorists, endowed with a sense of beauty of color, harmonious harmony of colors. But the basis of the visual language remained drawing and chiaroscuro, clearly and completely modeling the form. Color was understood rather as the outer shell of the form, not without reason, imposing colorful strokes, the artists fused them into a perfectly smooth, enamel surface. This style was also loved by Dutch artists who were the first to master the technique of oil painting….

Egyptian ostracons (part 3)
Ostracons often go beyond traditional motives. Among them there are drawings of a parody and satirical character. A number of plots, in which parallels to fables are guessed, are almost…

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Egyptian ostracons (part 3)
Ostracons often go beyond traditional motives. Among them there are drawings of a parody and satirical character. A number of plots, in which parallels to fables are guessed, are almost…

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Venice School of Painting (part 5)
The last great master of Venice of the 16th century, Jacopo Tintoretto, seems to be a complex and rebellious nature, a seeker of new paths in art, keenly and painfully…

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Coroplasts from Tanagra (part 3)
The movements of the Tanagryanoks are beautiful and measured, their gestures are restrained, and the expression on their faces is noble. Here is a woman, raising her raincoat, wants to…

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