Venice School of Painting (part 2)
Venetians more than the masters of other Italian schools appreciated the capabilities of this technique and completely transformed it. For example, the attitude of Dutch artists to the world was…

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How did the masters of the Italian Renaissance study (part 2)
Here is a quote from a book by Giovio, an Italian historian of the 16th century. He describes the teaching method of Leonardo da Vinci, which gives us an idea…

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Mexican painting of the first half of the XX century (part 2)
The start of the Mexican schedule itself was laid by the largest engraver of the XIX century - Jose Guadalupe Posada. He worked as an artist in newspapers, first in…

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monuments

Brotherhood of the Pre-Raphaelites (part 5)

Lizzy Siddal was a saleswoman of some fashionista when the artist Deverell saw her and admired the unusual, sophisticated beauty of a girl with copper-gold hair. She served as a model for Milles and other Pre-Raphaelites. But the jealous Rossetti wanted Lizzy to pose only to him. He drew it endlessly – sitting, standing, one head, often reproduced the appearance of a girl in small watercolors on the themes of Dante and Beatrice. She herself began to draw and write poetry. Continue reading

How did the masters of the Italian Renaissance study (part 3)
As another example, let us trace how the creative personality of Michelangelo was formed. For thirteen years he entered the studio of the painter Domenico Ghirlandaio. At age 15, he…

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Antique Cologne (part 2)
In its best days, ancient Cologne was a big city: 20-25 thousand people lived in it. One can imagine how fast this Roman city on the Rhine grew, how temples,…

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Venice School of Painting (part 4)
The art of Giorgione was a real revolution in Venetian painting, had a huge impact on contemporaries, including Titian, whose work the readers of the magazine already had the opportunity…

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Ordinary magic glass (part 1)
The expression "Venetian glass" has become a household word. It is used for a high appreciation of the artistic merits of works of glass. And it is no coincidence that…

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